Panel suggests suspension of Hunter Biden’s D.C. law license


The District’s Law Licensing Committee Recommends Suspending Hunter Biden’s Law License

The District’s law licensing committee for the D.C. Court of Appeals has recommended suspending the law license of Hunter Biden, roughly a week after he was convicted on felony gun charges in Delaware. President Biden‘s son has been licensed to practice law in the nation’s capital since 2007 under his full name, Robert H. Biden.

Hunter Biden Found Guilty of Lying on Federal Firearms Application

A jury in Wilmington, Del., found Hunter Biden guilty of three felony counts for lying on a federal firearms application. This set in motion the standard process in the District for a lawyer convicted of a felony. The Court of Appeals’ disciplinary counsel determined that the offenses for which Biden was found guilty constituted a “serious crime” under the D.C. Bar’s licensing rules.

Implications of Hunter Biden’s Conviction

The case brought Hunter Biden’s past drug use into the national spotlight. The jury found that he unlawfully possessed a gun for 11 days in 2018 while addicted to crack cocaine, falsely stating on the federal gun purchasing form that he was not using or addicted to illegal drugs at the time.

Suspension of Hunter Biden’s Law License

According to the letter from the disciplinary counsel, Hunter Biden has been “suspended immediately from the practice of law in the District of Columbia” pending further investigation. The judges have yet to accept the recommendation for the suspension to go into effect, which will be determined based on whether the case involved dishonesty or immorality as defined by the District’s bar licensing code.

Defense Arguments and Potential Sentencing

During the trial, Biden’s defense lawyers argued that prosecutors did not provide concrete evidence of his drug use at the time of purchasing the gun or while it was in his possession. The most serious charge Biden faces carries a maximum penalty of 10 years in prison, but as a first-time offender, he is likely to receive a lighter sentence.

Read More of this Story at www.washingtonpost.com – 2024-06-18 22:37:29

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